A home for all things Austen. So pour some tea, de-bonnet and prepare to fall in love with Jane all over again.

I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman’s inconstancy. Songs and proverbs, all talk of woman’s fickleness. But perhaps you will say, these were all written by men.

Perhaps I shall. Yes, yes, if you please, no reference to examples in books. Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.

Austen, Jane. Persuasion. (via wordsnquotes)

'Do not give way to useless alarm', added he, 'though it is right to be prepared for the worst, there is no occasion to look on it as certain.'

Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen. 

More than once did Elizabeth in her ramble within the Park unexpectedly meet Mr Darcy. She felt all the perverseness of the mischance that should bring him where no one else was brought; and to prevent its ever happening again, took care to inform him at first, that it was a favourite haunt of hers. How it could occur a second time therefore was very odd! - Yet it did, and even a third. It seemed like wilful ill-nature, or a voluntary penance, for on these occasions it was not merely a few formal enquiries and an awkward pause and then away, but he actually thought it necessary to turn back and walk with her.

Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen. (via the-library-and-step-on-it)

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
This veritable greeting card of a painting is Frederick Morgan’s Off for the Honeymoon.
To quote Bonhams on the subject of this painting, “[a]s society underwent dramatic change during the latter part of the 19th century, family, marriage and childhood became synonymous with stability and middle-class prosperity.”
Morgan has chosen the earlier part of the same century to present such themes, putting all the assembled in Regency dress.
The young man closest to the viewer is even wearing a skeleton suit, which Dickens describes thus: “cloth cases in which small boys used to be confined…fastening him into a very tight jacket, with an ornamental row of buttons over each shoulder, and then buttoning his trousers over it, so as to give his legs the appearance of being hooked on, just under the armpits.”

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

This veritable greeting card of a painting is Frederick Morgan’s Off for the Honeymoon.

To quote Bonhams on the subject of this painting, “[a]s society underwent dramatic change during the latter part of the 19th century, family, marriage and childhood became synonymous with stability and middle-class prosperity.”

Morgan has chosen the earlier part of the same century to present such themes, putting all the assembled in Regency dress.

The young man closest to the viewer is even wearing a skeleton suit, which Dickens describes thus: “cloth cases in which small boys used to be confined…fastening him into a very tight jacket, with an ornamental row of buttons over each shoulder, and then buttoning his trousers over it, so as to give his legs the appearance of being hooked on, just under the armpits.”